weather

weath|er1 [ `weðər ] noun uncount ***
the conditions that exist in the atmosphere relating to temperature, PRECIPITATION (=rain, snow, etc.), and other features:
Unsettled weather will continue through the weekend.
We couldn't paint the outside because of the weather.
good/bad/hot/cold/wet/dry etc. weather: He walked for five miles in bad weather.
a. the weather a report on the weather in a newspaper or on television:
The weather follows the news.
b. only before noun giving information about the weather:
a weather map/report
in all weather(s)
even when it is raining, snowing, etc.:
He goes out jogging in all weathers.
keep a weather eye on
to pay careful attention to a situation or person because something bad may happen
under the weather INFORMAL
if a person is under the weather, they do not feel well:
I've been feeling a little under the weather this week.
weather permitting
if the weather is appropriate:
The party will be held outside, weather permitting.
=> HEAVY1 10D
weather
weath|er 2 [ `weðər ] verb
1. ) intransitive or transitive if something weathers or is weathered, its appearance changes because of the effects of wind, rain, etc.:
The stone weathers to a beautiful pale gold.
Wind and sun had weathered his face.
2. ) transitive to manage a difficult experience without being seriously harmed:
He has weathered two corruption scandals already.
weather the storm (=come through a time of great difficulty): An improvement in the economy is helping us weather the storm.

Usage of the words and phrases in modern English. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Weather — Weath er, n. [OE. weder, AS. weder; akin to OS. wedar, OFries. weder, D. weder, we[^e]r, G. wetter, OHG. wetar, Icel. ve[eth]r, Dan. veir, Sw. v[ a]der wind, air, weather, and perhaps to OSlav. vedro fair weather; or perhaps to Lith. vetra storm …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Weather — Weath er, a. (Naut.) Being toward the wind, or windward opposed to lee; as, weather bow, weather braces, weather gauge, weather lifts, weather quarter, weather shrouds, etc. [1913 Webster] {Weather gauge}. (a) (Naut.) The position of a ship to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Weather — Weath er, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Weathered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Weathering}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To expose to the air; to air; to season by exposure to air. [1913 Webster] [An eagle] soaring through his wide empire of the air To weather his broad… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • weather — [weth′ər] n. [ME weder < OE, akin to ON vethr, Ger wetter < IE base * we , * awe , to blow > WIND2, OSlav vedro, fair weather] 1. the general condition of the atmosphere at a particular time and place, with regard to the temperature,… …   English World dictionary

  • weather — (n.) O.E. weder, from P.Gmc. *wedran (Cf. O.S. wedar, O.N. veðr, O.Fris., M.Du., Du. weder, O.H.G. wetar, Ger. Wetter storm, wind, weather ), from PIE *we dhro , weather, from root *we to blow (see WIND (Cf …   Etymology dictionary

  • Weather or No — is a one act comic opera, styled a musical duologue , by Bertram Luard Selby with a libretto by Adrian Ross and William Beach. It was produced at the Savoy Theatre from 10 August 1896 to 17 February 1897 as a companion piece to The Mikado , and… …   Wikipedia

  • weather — ► NOUN 1) the state of the atmosphere at a place and time as regards temperature, wind, rain, etc. 2) (before another noun ) denoting the side from which the wind is blowing; windward. Contrasted with LEE(Cf. ↑lee). ► VERB 1) wear away or change… …   English terms dictionary

  • weather — weath‧er [ˈweDə ǁ ər] verb [transitive] if a company, business etc weathers a difficult situation, it manages to come through it safely: • Small businesses were less able to weather the recession. • The company has weathered the slump better than …   Financial and business terms

  • Weather — assisted migration blizzaster climate porn Fogust geomythology gigantic jet Marchuary megacryometeor …   New words

  • Weather — Weath er, v. i. To undergo or endure the action of the atmosphere; to suffer meteorological influences; sometimes, to wear away, or alter, under atmospheric influences; to suffer waste by weather. [1913 Webster] The organisms . . . seem… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • weather — [n] atmospheric conditions climate, clime, elements; concepts 522,524 weather [v] endure acclimate, bear the brunt of*, bear up against*, become toughened, brave, come through, expose, get through, grow hardened, grow strong, harden, make it,… …   New thesaurus

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.